Continuing On to Antioch

It’s time to take stock once more of the developments of the last few months. The last entry in the series, brought things up to mid-March (although I added this mid-April post summarizing our activities during the Triduum and Pascha, since that was also a significant step along the journey toward Orthodoxy). At that point, the Healy’s as a family were going regularly to Sunday Liturgy, Anna had gotten involved in the moms-and-tots group, and I was reading St. Theophan the Recluse’s The Spiritual Life with some of the men of the parish.

And in the last few weeks, I’ve been granted some significant glimpses of Anna’s journey.
Continue reading “Continuing On to Antioch”

Ronald Reagan: Point du Hoc Speech on the 40th Anniversary of D-Day

Here are excerpts from Ronald Reagan’s Speech on the 40th Anniversary of D-Day (Point du Hoc):

The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge–and pray God we have not lost it–that there is a profound, moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One’s country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it’s the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you.

The Americans who fought here that morning knew word of the invasion was spreading through the darkness back home. They thought–or felt in their hearts, though they couldn’t know in fact, that in Georgia they were filling the churches at 4 a.m., in Kansas they were kneeling on their porches and praying, and in Philadelphia they were ringing the Liberty Bell.

Something else helped the men of D-Day: their rock-hard belief that Providence would have a great hand in the events that would unfold here; that God was an ally in this great cause. And so, the night before the invasion, when Colonel Wolverton asked his parachute troops to kneel with him in prayer he told them: Do not bow your heads, but look up so you can see God and ask His blessing in what we’re about to do. Also that night, General Matthew Ridgway on his cot, listening in the darkness for the promise God made to Joshua: “I will not fail thee nor forsake thee.”