Here’s to My Own Two Redneck Women . . . I’m So Damn Lucky!

Gretchen Wilson sez it best in Redneck Woman (Note: Website midi starts playing when you access the site):

Well I ain’t never
Been the barbie doll type
No I can’t swig that sweet champagne
I’d rather drink beer all night
In a tavern or in a honky tonk
Or on a 4 wheel drive tailgate
I’ve got posters on my wall of Skynard, Kid and Strait
Some people look down on me
But I don’t give a rip
I’ll stand barefooted in my own front yard with a baby on my hip

Cause I’m a redneck woman
I ain’t no high class broad
I’m just a product of my raisin’
And I say “hey y’all” and “Yee Haw”
And I keep my Christmas lights on, on my front porch all year long
And I know all the words to every Charlie Daniels song
So here’s to all my sisters out there keepin’ it country
Let me get a big “Hell Yeah” from the redneck girls like me
Hell Yeah
Hell Yeah
Continue reading “Here’s to My Own Two Redneck Women . . . I’m So Damn Lucky!”

Starting from Cane Ridge II

Renewal of Faith

I was born at the time of the split in the Disciples, so my upbringing in the Stone-Campbell churches reflected the difficult feelings resultant from the split. My understanding of the Church was staunchly anti-denominational, and, to a degree, anti-intellectual, both reactions to theological liberalism and to the denominationalism that forced out most of the former Disciples churches.

As is often the case with young believers, my teen years proved a difficult time, especially concerning faith and morals. Although I would not have denied the central Christian doctrines I had been taught–such as the divinity of Christ and the Trinitarian understanding of God–in terms of moral behavior, I succumbed to those fairly typical temptations of teen years: lust, drunkenness, lying, and mistreatment of other “weaker” teens. Being a year-round sport letterman, I fit in with the “macho athletic” crowd, got into some fights, and picked on other kids. At the same time, being in the accelerated study program, I was held to higher expectations, and was fairly frequently in outright rebellion with my teachers and other authority figures. Although drugs made inroads among my peers, by my own parents’ involvement in my life, as well as the mercy of God, I was kept free from drug use. Too, I’d seen the effects drugs had had among my own family members, losing an uncle to the downward spiral drugs inflict, and so had a strong influence against using drugs.
Continue reading “Starting from Cane Ridge II”